• Is small beautiful?

    Spark Energy. Extra Energy. Gen4U. Future Energy. Usio Energy.Iresa. National Gas & Power. These seven small companies have one thing in common. During 2018, each ceased providing electricity supplies to British customers.

    During last year there were no fewer than 73 active electricity suppliers  licensed by the regulator Ofgem . In 2017 there were 60. This time seven years ago, there were just 14.

  • "Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing”

    Large electricity suppliers must triple the number of smart meters they are installing, in order to meet the 2020 rollout deadline, consumer group Which? has warned. 

  • “Stands Scotland where it did?”

    ScottishPower has been paid £107 million for switching off its wind turbines during a three-year delay in completing an undersea cable project which was supposed to solve that very problem.

  • No saint Bernard

    The new chairman of the UK’s principal climate science denier campaign group holds investments in a number of fossil fuel companies, including those building controversial oil and gas pipelines in Canada.

  • People power

    There is still that fond belief around that we in the UK have far more influence upon our political masters than do those living under the yoke of a totalitarian government, like the Communists running China. Increasingly, I wonder whether this isn’t just a convenient myth.

  • “The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell”

    There has been great astonishment that one of the oil majors, Shell, has announced its intention to become the world’s biggest power company within 15 years. The multinational thinks electrification will grow rapidly, and is apparently eyeing double digit returns from “smart trading and the management of flexibility.”

  • Energy Star-Crossed Lovers

    Rightly, the European Union has long touted the effectiveness of its mandatory A to G energy labelling scheme for electronic equipment. It is already saving the average British household over £100 a year on electricity bills.

  • "Every man according to his work"

    Fascinating latest figures tabulating actual employment in the low carbon sector, supplied by the Office for National Statistics.

  • Tempus Non Fugit

    I confess I was always rather impressed by the Demand Response Association. Its public utterances were always pertinent, forceful and “took no prisoners.”

  • A Brazilian cut

    For those who despair about the political machinations of Brexitland, here is a cautionary tale from South America, and the way in which the electricity market is run there.

  • Follow the money

    The US Senate recently voted against the proposed Green New Deal programme, designed to combat the threat of climate change by reducing sales of coal, oil and natural gas.

  • You want how much?

    German utility RWE – owner of Npower in Britain – wants 10 times more compensation to close its ageing German lignite plants than they are worth, according to the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis. 

  • Not coins of the realm

    The increasing use of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies threatens a catastrophic escalation of climate change, a new study is warning. Scientists say the amount of electricity involved in ‘mining’ the cryptocurrency could boost global temperatures by more than two degrees by 2033.

  • Serious miscalculation

    Next time you hear some loudmouth claiming that nuclear power is carbon free, just remember that, according to the International Energy Agency, overall emissions from new nuclear are 78 to 178 g-CO2/kWh.

  • Green, with envy?

    The most depressing report in years arrives from comparethemarket.com. It reveals that the 14% of households now overtly trying to 'go green’ with their energy supply are being seriously let down by misleading tariffs.

  • The wealth of nations?

    Having a bit of a tidy up, I chanced upon a study issued in 2013 by the Adam Smith Institute, a long established ‘free market’ lobby group much cited by right wing MPs. The publication is titled Policy Study 403: Limits of Windpower

  • Crying wolf

    The Energy Intensive Users Group has been in existence for 20 years. During this time, they have repeated the same simple two mantras: Electricity prices in the UK are too high, and if they aren’t reduced immediately, heavy industry will up and leave.

  • Global warning for Boris

    Just about the largest single donation to former foreign secretary Al “Boris” Johnson’s campaign to become Prime Minister came from Terence Mordaunt, via his company First Corporate Shipping.

  • A fracking great Ponzi scheme

    2019 was supposed to be the year that American shale oil and gas producers finally reined in spending, with the goal of funding all new development from free cash flow. And just like every other year, it didn’t take long for those plans to unravel.

  • New PM very far from green

    Our new Prime Minister Al “Boris” Johnson likes to portray himself as somebody committed to delivering the most environmentally friendly electricity system.