The new electricity market pricing system that came in to effect on Thursday 5 November will place even more responsibility on generators to improve the management of their supply imbalances or face much higher pricing penalties.

Electrical Review was last week invited to meet Tessa Ogle, the new managing director of the The Electrical Industries Charity.

An experienced general management professional with an extensive track record in leading business growth, Ogle joins the charity from Parsons Brinckerhoff (a Balfour Beatty company) where she held the position of national general manager for oil and gas.

Ogle said:“Since the Electrical Trades Benevolent Institution was founded in 1905 the charity has continued to evolve and now provides financial relief and practical support to more people in the electrical related industries than ever before.

“Two thirds of our current beneficiaries are of working age but the majority are ‘economically inactive’ due to redundancy, illness, injury or caring responsibilities. Our aim as a charity is to reach more working people and provide the support which is essential to them.

“This is therefore a very exciting time to be joining the Electrical Industries Charity and I look forward to working with the industry to ensure that we continue to provide help and support to our people when they need it most.”

Under Ogle’s leadership the charity will focus on four key programmes, the Apprenticeship Support Programme; Employee and Family Support Programme; Pensioner Support Programme and a Practical Participation Programme.

It is so important we continue to support those in our industry who need help. Please do visit www.electricalcharity.org for details on future fundraising events.

In last week’s newsletter we reported on training provider JTL chief executive’s response to an Ofsted report suggesting apprenticeships are delivering poor quality for money and seeing thousands of “under achieving” young people.

Jon Graham said he is disappointed the headline messaging that has been seized upon, ignores the very positive results and outcomes many specialist providers are delivering for the UK economy. Read the full article here. 

I received a response from an M&E construction manager:

“I was interested to read your article , I served a very structured JIB apprenticeship with C J Bartley & Co Ltd from June 1981 till July 1984. There was an appointed apprentice manager who had involvement in workplace training and college courses.

Now watching all three of my own children and speaking to their friends who are going through modern Apprenticeships , I see a wide variation in training. Some are very structured ie UKPN others seem to lack any clear direction on what is the end goal and the route to it.

I now work as an M&E manager on London Power Tunnel project , using a wide variety of tradesman, for too many years the educational focus seems to of been to get people into university this seems to of created the situation where we potentially have a lot of chiefs(often with no idea) and very few Indians with the sufficient skillset to become capable tradesman.

I now look at an ageing workforce thinking what will happen when we are too old to work.”

As always, I would be interested to hear your thoughts.





Training provider JTL’s chief executive has responded to this week’s Ofsted report that seems to suggest apprenticeships are delivering poor quality for money and seeing thousands of “under achieving” young people.

Jon Graham said he is disappointed the headline messaging that has been seized upon, ignores the very positive results and outcomes many specialist providers are delivering for the UK economy.

Graham commented: “We welcome Ofsted’s  investigation into apprenticeship issues and their concerns around quality and accept that their comments have  resonance in the wider apprenticeship field, where many short-term apprenticeships have been developed in areas that do not support fundamental business requirements - such as addressing the national skills shortage.

“However, we’d have liked to have seen more media coverage of the benefits of apprenticeships to the economy too – for instance a recent report estimated a Higher Apprenticeship can increase an individual’s lifetime earning potential by up to £150,000, comparable to the return for a university graduate.

“I also think it’s important to recognise that there are many high quality training providers not reflected in these headlines. Achievement rates on apprenticeships are higher than ever before, and we’re particularly delighted that through pre-screening and ongoing candidate assessment and review, JTL consistently performs 10% higher than the national success rate in our apprenticeship training, with completion rates of around 80%. We know other training organisations have experienced similar success levels with their apprentices too.

“If you delve more deeply into the Ofsted report it does acknowledge that there are training providers doing a good job, so it is very disappointing that the headlines we’ve seen today following publication have treated all apprenticeships in the same way.”

I would be very interested to hear your views.

Data Centre news from our sister title

 

@elecreviewmag